Stephen Lynch (D-MA-8)i

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Stephen Lynch Congressman District 9

Stephen Lynch is the incumbent in the 2002 – 2010 Massachusetts District 9 and running for reelection in the 2012 – 2020 Massachusetts District 8.

House links: Stephen F. Lynch (D-MA-9)i

Campaign links: Stephen F. Lynch (D-MA-8)i

 

Stephen F. Lynch

Stephen Lynch Congressional Candidate Massachusetts District 8

 

of Stephen Lynch from House.gov

Congressman Stephen F. Lynch was first sworn in to the United States Congress in October 2001, following the sudden passing of legendary Congressman John Joseph Moakley.

The son of Francis Lynch, an ironworker, and Anne Lynch, a postal clerk, Congressman Lynch was born and raised in the public housing projects of South Boston.

Upon graduation from South Boston High School in 1973, Congressman Lynch entered the Ironworkers Apprenticeship Program and later joined his father as a member of Boston’s Ironworkers Local 7. He worked as a structural ironworker for 18 years and was eventually elected to serve as president of The Iron Workers Union, the youngest president in the history of the 2000 member union.

Congressman Lynch continued his education at Wentworth Institute of Technology on nights and weekends, earning a Bachelor’s degree in Construction Management. He later received a law degree from Boston College Law School, was admitted to both the Massachusetts and New Hampshire Bar, and continued his advocacy for working people as a labor and employment attorney.

In 1994, Congressman Lynch was elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives. After just fourteen months in office, he was elected to the Massachusetts State Senate in a special election. In the Senate, he served as the Chair of the Joint Committee on Commerce and Labor.

In 1999, he earned a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government.

During his career as an ironworker, Congressman Lynch worked at the General Motors Plant in Framingham, Massachusetts, the General Dynamics Shipyard in Quincy, Massachusetts and the U.S. Steel Plant in Gary, Indiana, all of which were either shut down or severly curtailed due to unfair foreign trade practices. Congressman Lynch’s first-hand experience in seeing the effects of plant closings on American workers and on local communities has led him to focus on efforts to improve U.S. Trade Policy and protect American jobs.

In the 112th Congress, Congressman Lynch is a member of the Financial Services Committee and the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, where he serves as Ranking Member on the Subcommittee on Federal Workforce, U.S. Postal Service and Labor Policy. Lynch is also a member of the Subcommittee on National Security, Homeland Defense and Foreign Operations and the Subcommittee on Technology, Information Policy, Intergovernmental Relations and Procurement Reform.

Congressman Lynch is a co-founder of the Congressional Labor and Working Families Caucus, which was formed to protect workers rights and educate Members of Congress on issues that impact American families.

Lynch continues to serve as co-chair of the Task Force on Terrorism and Proliferation Financing, a bipartisan Congressional panel that monitors the status of national and international efforts to track and stop the flow of funds to terrorist groups and works to strengthen our national anti-terrorist finance strategy.

He and his wife Margaret continue to live in their lifelong hometown of South Boston where they are raising their daughter Victoria and niece Crystal.

Biography of Stephen Lynch from Stephen F. Lynch for Congress Committee

Stephen F. Lynch was sworn in to the United States Congress in October 2001, following the passing of legendary and fifteen-term Congressman John Joseph Moakley. His primary election took place on September 11, 2001.

Common Man. Uncommon Leader.

The son of Francis Lynch, an ironworker, and Anne Lynch, a postal clerk, Stephen was born and raised in South Boston’s Old Colony Public Housing Development with his five sisters. While attending South Boston High School, Stephen joined his father as a member of Ironworkers Local 7 in Boston.

For eighteen years, he put on his work boots and climbed the iron, working as a structural ironworker. Working the high iron gave him a unique perspective. From the top of those skyscrapers, he never lost sight of the public housing project where he spent his childhood. He never lost sight of the lessons taught by hard working parents. And he never lost sight of the promise of America – that with courage, hard work and determination, anyone can go higher and further.

As an early testament to his leadership skills and commitment to serving working people, he was elected to serve as President of Ironworkers Local #7 – the youngest president in the history of the 2,000-member union. He went to school at night and on weekends to earn his Bachelor’s Degree in Construction Management from Wentworth Institute of Technology.

Stephen continued his advocacy on behalf of working families through a second career as a labor and employment attorney, after receiving his law degree from Boston College Law School and being admitted to both the Massachusetts and New Hampshire Bars.

In 1994, Stephen’s experience in addressing the cares and concerns of working people transformed into a career in public service when his neighbors elected him to the Massachusetts House of Representatives. Just fourteen months later, he was elected to the Massachusetts State Senate in a special election. He served as Chair of the Joint Committee on Commerce and Labor and led efforts to better safeguard worker rights and promote responsible business development in the Commonwealth. In 1999, he earned a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government.

Common Sense. Uncommon Courage.

Currently in Congress, Stephen has earned a reputation as a leader who takes principled stands in tough political environments and applies a common sense approach to his votes. He was one of only 95 Democrats to vote against the “Bank Bailout”, feeling that hard working Americans would unjustly have to foot the bill while the people being bailed out continued to pay themselves huge bonuses. And that’s just what happened.

Refusing to bend to tremendous political pressure, he voted a principled “no” on the Senate version of Health Care Reform, knowing that he would pay a political price. But he also knew that simply adding 32 million people into a broken system – no matter how noble an effort – will not fix the problem. The bill allowed insurance companies to continue to operate as monopolies and did nothing to drive down costs. It also taxes the health insurance benefits of hard working Americans, many of whom stood on picket lines and took less money in their paychecks to ensure that they had good insurance coverage.

As Democratic Chair of the Anti-Terrorist Financing Task Force, he remains one of the Democrats’ most active members of this bipartisan coalition in the effort to track and disrupt the financing of terrorist activity. He worked with House Republicans to monitor national and international efforts to track and stop the flow of funds to terrorist groups and worked to strengthen international anti-terrorist finance strategy.

He currently serves as a member of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, the chief oversight and investigatory panel in the House of Representatives. In addition, he serves as the Chair of the Subcommittee on Federal Employees, the Postal Service and the District of Columbia.

He served on the Government Reform Subcommittee on Regulatory Affairs, where he had consistently fought for worker safety and environmental regulations. He also sits on the Government Reform Subcommittee on National Security, Emerging Threats, and International Relations, where he continues to advocate strengthening our nation’s rail and port security.

In addition, Congressman Lynch serves on the House Committee on Financial Services, a panel that covers a variety of issues that reach far beyond banking regulation. He authored the Retirement Security Education Act, which aimed to enhance financial knowledge as well as reduce financial abuse and fraud among seniors.

Throughout his time in public office, Stephen has been a staunch supporter of our nation’s military men and women. His dozens of trips to to Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan have prompted him to fight for better equipment for our troops; better health care and housing assistance for veterans and he fought for enhanced services to veterans with amputations and prosthetic devices.

Stephen Lynch has a strong belief that government should work for the people it serves. He has an outstanding record of responding to the needs of his constituents and helping them to navigate through the red tape of government agencies. Whether it’s a missing social security check, assistance with housing, or a lost passport, his office has a well earned reputation as the place to go when you need help.

Congressman Lynch has been a lifelong resident of his hometown of South Boston, where he and his wife Margaret are raising their daughter Victoria and niece Crystal. Though he works in Washington during the week, he prides himself on his commitment to get home to the district when his votes in Congress are done and regularly attends local town meeting. He strives to stay in close touch with all of the cities and towns in the district.