Anthony Weiner (D-NY)

Back to NY Candidate BiosAnthony Weiner

Anthony Weiner, former Congressman New York District 9. Served from January 3, 1999 til June 21, 2011. He resigned amid a sexting scandal in June 2011.

 

 

 

Anthony David Weiner

 

 

Biography of Anthony Weiner Biography from House.gov

[2011 Bio] Although he didn’t come from a political or powerful family, New York City is in Anthony Weiner’s blood. After spending his toddler years in a Rochdale Village Mitchell-Lama housing unit, Anthony was raised in his birthplace of Brooklyn, and now lives in Queens. The son of a public school teacher, and the product of our public schools, he graduated Brooklyn Technical High School in 1981 and SUNY Plattsburgh in 1985.

 

A true product of New York’s hardworking middle class, Anthony Weiner knows the challenges most families face, and has worked hard to make sure that all New Yorkers get a shot at a good life.

 

After college, he went to work for then-Congressman Charles Schumer, and, after more than six years working for Chuck in Washington and at home in Brooklyn, Anthony launched a long shot bid for the City Council. He didn’t have as much money as the other candidates in the field and he was opposed by the political powerbrokers, but he inspired his neighbors with his campaign based on “no promises – just hard work.” Anthony Weiner won a six-way primary and a four-way general election to become – at the time – the youngest person ever elected to the City Council.

 

In his years in the City Council, Weiner won a reputation as a thoughtful fighter for New York’s neighborhoods. He initiated programs to tackle “quality of life” concerns. He started a program to take at-risk and troublesome teens and put them to work cleaning graffiti. He called them “Weiner’s Cleaners”. He spearheaded development plans for historic Sheepshead Bay that led to a revival of the area. And when supermarkets started leaving the neighborhood, Anthony worked night and day to reverse the trend.

 

Anthony Weiner also won citywide recognition for his efforts as the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Public Housing. His fights on behalf of some of New York’s most underserved and underrepresented citizens won him many admirers. He fought to increase federal funding for Public Housing, to ban dangerous dogs from the projects and to add more police officers to the beat. But it was his investigation into the cause of sudden and fatal stairwell fires that made him front page news. He exposed dangerous practices that eventually led the city to replace the paint in developments citywide.

 

A hallmark of Anthony Weiner’s work in the New York City Council was his tireless efforts on behalf of our city’s “underdogs” – small business owners, recent immigrants and homeowners.

 

When Congressman Schumer decided to run against Senator Al D’Amato in 1998, Weiner ran to replace him in the district that included Brooklyn and Queens. Again he faced long odds: Not enough money; neither the Brooklyn nor Queens political organizations supported him; and a busy field of more experienced candidates. But with the support of his mentor, Chuck Schumer, and pursuing a dogged door-to-door grassroots campaign, Anthony Weiner went to Washington.

 

It didn’t take long for Congressman Anthony Weiner to impress his colleagues. He was immediately appointed to the powerful Judiciary Committee and was elected “Whip” of his class. After September 11th, Weiner was the only New Yorker appointed by the Democratic Leader to serve on the Homeland Security Task Force.

 

In 2005, animated by the plight of the middle class and those struggling to make it, Weiner ran for Mayor of New York City. His straight talk message of tax cuts for New York’s middle class families, better schools for New York’s kids and cutting government waste resonated across the five boroughs.

 

He surged more than 20 points in the final days of the primary, placing a close second behind Bronx Borough President Fernando Ferrer, forcing a potentially contentious runoff. With a general election only eight short weeks away, Weiner decided party unity was of paramount concern. In a move that earned the respect of the public, his colleagues and Democratic Party leaders, he unified the party by conceding the race and backing Ferrer, his one-time opponent, as the Democratic nominee.

 

Weiner’s campaign based on common-sense ideas and grassroots energy led the New York Post to say “Weiner represents the new persona of the Democratic party.” New York Newsday suggested that Weiner set “a new political paradigm” and the New York Times called him the “wonk of the campaign.”

 

Anthony Weiner currently sits on the Energy and Commerce Committee, which has the largest jurisdiction in the U.S. House, overseeing telecommunications, public health, air quality and environmental protection, the nation’s energy policy, and interstate and foreign commerce. He also serves on the Judiciary Committee and as a part of the Democratic leadership team.

 

Anthony Weiner lives in Forest Hills, Queens and returns home whenever the Congress is not in session. And his work in Washington shows his commitment to his hometown. He has brought millions of dollars home to New York City: Funds Funding to restore our city’s parks and beaches; funds to improve the collection of DNA to solve crimes against women; funds for programs for developmentally disabled; funds to combat pests that have ravaged our trees; funds for additional police officers; funds to improve pedestrian safety; funds to bring ferry transportation to more New Yorkers; and even funds funding to clean graffiti.

 

He has also fought to uphold New York values. The National Reproductive Rights Action League (NARAL) praised him for his vigilant efforts on behalf of a woman’s right to choose. He has won perfect scores from our nation’s largest environmental groups. And Congressman Weiner was given the “honor” of a grade of “F” from the National Rifle Association.

 

New York Magazine called him “an ascendant force in New York politics.” The Daily News named him one of the “Leaders of the Twenty-First Century.” PoliticsNY.Com gave him their highest rating and judged him “among the best the Empire State sends to Congress…no one out-works Weiner.” The Forward called him one of the 50 most influential Jewish Americans.

 

Biography of Anthony Weiner from Friends of Weiner

[2011 Bio] Anthony Weiner is a middle class fighter, a dedicated reformer, and a true New Yorker.

 

Fighter

 

Anthony worked for then-Congressman Charles Schumer, and, after more than six years working in Washington and at home in Brooklyn, he launched a long shot bid for the City Council. He didn’t have as much money as the other candidates in the field and he was opposed by the political powerbrokers, but he inspired his neighbors with his campaign based on “no promises – just hard work.” Anthony Weiner won a six-way primary and a four-way general election to become – at the time – the youngest person ever elected to the City Council.

 

In his years in the City Council, Weiner won a reputation as a thoughtful fighter for New York’s neighborhoods. He initiated programs to tackle “quality of life” concerns. He started a program to take at-risk and troublesome teens and put them to work cleaning graffiti. He spearheaded development plans for historic Sheepshead Bay that led to a revival of the area. And when supermarkets started leaving the neighborhood, Anthony worked night and day to reverse the trend.

 

Anthony Weiner also won citywide recognition for his efforts as the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Public Housing. His fights on behalf of some of New York’s most underserved and underrepresented citizens won him many admirers. He fought to increase federal funding for Public Housing, to ban dangerous dogs from the projects and to add more police officers to the beat. But it was his investigation into the cause of sudden and fatal stairwell fires that made him front page news. He exposed dangerous practices that eventually led the city to replace the paint in developments citywide.

 

A hallmark of Anthony Weiner’s work in the New York City Council was his tireless efforts on behalf of our city’s “underdogs” – small business owners, recent immigrants and homeowners.

 

Reformer

 

Anthony’s career has also been marked by a drive for reform—from the streets of New York City to the halls of Congress.

 

That’s why, when Congressman Schumer decided to run against Senator Al D’Amato in 1998, Weiner ran to replace him in the district that included Brooklyn and Queens. Again he faced long odds, not enough money; neither the Brooklyn nor Queens political organizations supported him; and a busy field of more experienced candidates. But with the support of his mentor, Chuck Schumer, and a dogged door-to-door grassroots campaign, Anthony Weiner went to Washington.

 

It didn’t take long for Congressman Anthony Weiner to impress his colleagues. He was immediately appointed to the powerful Judiciary Committee and was elected “Whip” of his class. After September 11th, Weiner was the only New Yorker appointed by the Democratic Leader to serve on the Homeland Security Task Force.

 

Anthony Weiner currently sits on the Energy and Commerce Committee, which has the largest jurisdiction in the U.S. House, overseeing telecommunications, public health, air quality and environmental protection, the nation’s energy policy, and interstate and foreign commerce. He also serves on the Judiciary Committee and as a part of the Democratic leadership team.

 

These roles have given Anthony the opportunity to fight for his constituents, and reform government—cutting waste, demanding better performance, and ensuring we get the most for our money in Washington.

 

New Yorker

 

Although he didn’t come from a political or powerful family, New York City is in Anthony Weiner’s blood. After spending his toddler years in a Rochdale Village Mitchell-Lama housing unit, Anthony was raised in his birthplace of Brooklyn, and now lives in Queens. The son of a public school teacher, and the product of our public schools, he graduated Brooklyn Technical High School in 1981 and SUNY Plattsburgh in 1985.

 

Anthony lives in Forest Hills, Queens and returns home whenever the Congress is not in session. And his work in Washington shows his commitment to his hometown. He has brought millions of dollars home to New York City: Funding to restore our city’s parks and beaches; funds to improve the collection of DNA to solve crimes against women; funds for programs for developmentally disabled children; funds to combat pests that have ravaged our trees; funds for additional police officers; funds to improve pedestrian safety; funds to bring ferry transportation to more New Yorkers; and even funds funding to clean graffiti.

 

He has always fought to uphold New York values. The National Reproductive Rights Action League (NARAL) praised him for his vigilant efforts on behalf of a woman’s right to choose. He has won perfect scores from our nation’s largest environmental groups. And Congressman Weiner was given the “honor” of a grade of “F” from the National Rifle Association.

 

New York Magazine called him “an ascendant force in New York politics.” The Daily News named him one of the “Leaders of the Twenty-First Century.” PoliticsNY.Com gave him their highest rating and judged him “among the best the Empire State sends to Congress…no one out-works Weiner.” The Forward called him one of the 50 most influential Jewish Americans.

 

In 2005, animated by the plight of the middle class and those struggling to make it, Weiner ran for Mayor of New York City. His straight talk message of tax cuts for New York’s middle class families, better schools for New York’s kids and cutting government waste resonated across the five boroughs.

 

He surged more than 20 points in the final days of the primary, placing a close second behind Bronx Borough President Fernando Ferrer, forcing a potentially contentious runoff. With a general election only eight short weeks away, Weiner decided party unity was of paramount concern. In a move that earned the respect of the public, his colleagues and Democratic Party leaders, he unified the party by conceding the race and backing Ferrer, his one-time opponent, as the Democratic nominee.

 

Anthony’s campaign based on common-sense ideas and grassroots energy led the New York Post to say “Weiner represents the new persona of the Democratic party.” New York Newsday suggested that Weiner set “a new political paradigm” and the New York Times called him the “wonk of the campaign.”

 

Fighter.  Reformer.  New Yorker.  That’s who Anthony Weiner is, who he cares about, and how he is working to make a difference.

Do you know where you still on the political spectrum? See “Political Beliefs, Where Are You” to find out where you stand.